Intuition

“It’s not that the facts don’t matter; it’s just that they can’t tell the whole story.” – Michael Meade

In our culture, there’s much debate around fact versus opinion—but not much support for intuitive knowing. Those who are closely connected to their instinctual selves through their intuition are often rejected by others, even when it is precisely that sort of knowledge that would be most helpful.

Eventually, we all find ourselves in a situation that calls for intuitive thinking—a time when no other kind of reasoning or rationality will make sense of things. For those who have spent their lives keeping their intuition at a distance, the process of reconnecting can be difficult. It can, oddly enough, feel counterintuitive. I see this all the time in my work with women struggling with disordered eating.

Ignoring Intuition

In my work with women struggling with disordered eating, it’s become clear to me that women have been taught to repeatedly suppress their intuitive thinking, and that there are negative consequences.

Throughout their lives, women learn that when they voice concerns or share perceptions that can’t be validated by the five senses or through a traditionally logical process, they’re ridiculed or even punished. They’re told that they’re exaggerating or making things up, or being silly or irrational. They’re told in no uncertain terms that their realities are wrong and so, to avoid this backlash, they learn to hide and ultimately ignore their intuitive sense. This eventually leads women to become distrustful of their own intuition, and this valuable source of so much knowledge is driven underground. Its language is no longer recognized or acknowledged.

Reclaiming Intuition

Women who have struggled with disordered eating are doubly familiar with the criticisms launched at intuitive thinking—this idea that you are being irrational or illogical, or that there is some easy, obvious solution that you are simply missing. It should come as no surprise, then, that the two are connected.

Recovery from disordered eating involves reclaiming your intuition—reconnecting with your inner authority that provides uniquely personal knowledge and guidance. It involves learning to use your intellect to SUPPORT (not discredit!) information obtained through intuitive channels, and understanding that the two are equally valuable. It requires you to develop a deep appreciation for the wise, compassionate guidance that is always available to you; you need only listen, and choose to incorporate intuitive knowledge into your life rather than ignore it. You’ll be amazed at the strength, love, and healing this wisdom brings.

I would love to hear from you…how have you reclaimed your intution?

Warmly,
Anita

  • My intuition and my intellect are in conflict. Trusting my intuition makes me feel confused. I followed my intuition into a relationship with a man who helped me successfully lose weight with exercise and eat healthy. I felt physically strong and healthy. But that relationship turned abusive. Since I left that abusive relationship 3 years ago, I’m overeating, rarely exercising and gained 60 pounds back. I don’t trust my intuition because I felt my intuition lead me into an abusive relationship with a man. Now I’m following my intellect by staying safe with “no contact” but I’m completely lacking inner motivation to move my body. I just work, eat and sleep. I need help.

  • {"email":"Email address invalid","url":"Website address invalid","required":"Required field missing"}

    Related Posts

    Dr. Anita Johnston

    11/20/2020

    What if You Could Love Recovery_

    Laura Bastion

    11/06/2020

    Letting Go

    Dr. Anita Johnston

    10/30/2020

    Riding the Waves of Recovery

    Dr. Anita Johnston

    10/23/2020

    Intuition

    Find the Hidden Meaning in Your Food Choices

    >